How To Get Through a Literature Reviews… Breathtaking!!!!

Literally…. Breath Taking!

I know, you must think I made a mistake! Breathtaking is one word, not two. Well, that depends on how one uses it. Using it as one word would have you assume that I am saying that literature reviews are awesome, beautiful… even inspiring. BUT… using it as two words means that I am saying they take my breath away!!! Literally!!!
I am so incredibly stressed after each Literature review, that it makes my eyes water and shut down all at once. The pain… The excruciating PAIN of literature reviews.

Using regular APA formatting that most colleges require today, the latest literature review I did wound up being 7 pages out of a 20-page study, that included graphs and charts. Therefore, the whole study had about 12 written pages. That means I only scaled it down to under 50% of the original writing. OUCH!!! And, I can’t seem to pump out more than one review a day because they are sooo taxing!

Anyhow, I want to share my methods with everyone. Maybe you can share your methods with me so that I can see a better way than how I am currently doing it. YES… Somebody help me!!!

Steps to a literature review…

1 – Find the material you need for your subject. I look in the online library of my school and on Google Scholar.

2 – Print out all of the reviews of interest and staple the pages together.

3 – Re-read all the abstracts and some of the study, just to confirm that they are going to work for your topic. If they don’t work, just toss them to the side. You would hate to need them later if they were already in the trash.

4 – Order the study based on importance, working on the important ones first.

5- Read the entire study while highlighting anything you think you will want to add to your review

6 – Re-read all the highlighted text and rephrase it into your own words. If you must quote a specific person, use quotation marks and list the page number.

7 – The final product should have this list that I put together from a document that I received from Dr. Brown:

1-A discussion of the author(s)’ study or analysis objectives
2-An explanation of the theoretical approach or framework used for the study or written analysis
3-An explanation of the methodology, research or writing approach used by
the author(s)
4-A summary of the author(s)’ major findings and conclusions
5-A critique on the quality and merits of the written work and evaluation of whether or not the author(s) achieved their objectives
6-A recommendation on what further scholarly study or analysis should be pursued

This has been a long and grueling process. Please comment below if you can help a fellow student get this done any quicker or easier. Blessings!!!

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